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via dpg (274) · I build things like product and community.

Support this site and purchase one of these awesome I OpenSSL t-shirts! Made from comfy tagless hanes material, your nerd friends will drool at your power level being over 9000. Get geek cred now, and never forget.


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via jenDewalt (1) · blog.42floors.com
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via leafo (4) · leafo.net
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via dpg (274) · I build things like product and community.

The following is a good list of resources to start figuring out how to get your site optimized for search engines. If anyone has any additional tips, let us know in the comments:

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via andy (37) · www.nytimes.com
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via NeoBars (1) feedback
New service for creating browser extensions for all major browsers, easy and for free.
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via dpg (274) · I build things like product and community.

If you need to really concentrate, you probably want to get rid of your social networks first. The way we block these sites and services is by redirecting the site's hostname to our local machine. That way any requests made to say, facebook or twitter, are redirected back to us instead of being sent out to their servers, effectively eliminating our ability to be distracted. It is reversible, so don't worry.

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via andy (37)

Check out the navy's railgun that is entering sea tests. It's build by General Atomics and is pretty impressive. Here is a wired article with more info.

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via thr33 (17) · I moved to SF from the Northwest. I now teach at a local development school. Trying to change the world with javascript, one piece of code at a time.

Join SF Hacker News and meet new people, share your project, and have some free drinks and dinner!

Mixer starts at 7pm, Demos/Pitches start at 8pm.

Grab Your Tickets Here


via dpg (274) ask

I've never had a mentor, so I don't know if it comes naturally or should I be asking people to mentor me. How do you find people and develop that relationship? Do you just come right out and ask?

Another problem is that all the people I respect seem to not have very much time or are impossible to contact. How do I find a mentor on the level or beyond where I would like to be headed?

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Been wondering this myself for a while. Sometimes that relationship happens naturally, which is nice. But I think if you admire someone, it's okay to outright ask or to ask them to grab coffee with you. People love to be flattered, so it's fair to sa

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via dpg (274) · I build things like product and community.

Recently, I was chatting with a friend about startups, investing, trends, life, and we came upon the topic of the "Internet of Things" (IoT). He smirked, and I could sense his jaded reaction before he even opened his mouth to respond.

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via andy (37) · Co-Founder at Fighting Walrus (www.fightingwalrus.com)

Come check out the Robot Block Party near Stanford April 9th 1-4pm. Myself and a bunch of other interesting folks and robots will be there hanging out.

More info and free tickets here: http://www.svrobo.org/calendar/robot-block-party


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via Chloro (0) books

I have been meaning to add this to my collection, I have heard just about every computer scientist talk about it!

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via dpg (274) books

This is what I personally cut my teeth on. It taught me some of the basic valuable lessons every introductory programmer should learn. Still applicable today as it was in 1978/1988 -- a true classic that everyone should read through at least once.

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via dpg (274) · inventor-labs.com
A new school review has been posted
via ndaftary (1) schools

I had joined the 2nd cohort at MakerSquare in fall of 2013 (proof! http://blog.themakersquare.com/2013/09/11/makersquare-student-spotlight-nikhil-daftary-living-the-developer-dream/).

Prior to MakerSquare, I had tried learning Ruby and JS on my own, through countless books and online tutorials. Having completed a few guides, I realized that my ability to learn "how to code" was hindered simply by my style of learning. I love interactive q/a style learning, which is what led me to MakerSquare.

Of the different programs out there, the one thing I would urge others to consider is that they place a heavy amount of weight onto prework completed (how much work you've done ahead of time) and community-fit. If you're a solo worker and not a fan of collaborative environments, you may want to consider other programs.

Anyways, long story short, I would whole heartedly recommend this program. As classmates, I had former programmers, retail store workers, a professional photographer and even a former elementary teacher. Out of the program, each of the students were working as professional front-end engineers (junior developers) within weeks of graduating. So safe to say, MakerSquare has a great professional network, and they know how to teach code.

The classroom environment (the location on Congress ave) was a bit cramped at times. But from what I've heard the class size is now capped at 18, vs. 30 or so when I went through.

All the 'issues' I had (space constraints, less than ideal student:instructor ratio, and focus on advanced concepts (algorithms and data structures) has been completely addressed. According to the staff, Cohort 5 is operating on an almost night/day difference of curriculum than what I had.

So not only do I give the program 5 stars, I would (and likely will) retake the course to take advantage of their newest curriculum.

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via dpg (274) · liefstorer.com
A new school review has been posted
via agibsonccc (1) schools

I teach here so I may or may not be biased, but our students have been hired by the likes of facebook and tesla. AMA

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via jenDewalt (1) · Founder at YumHacker. Maker of 180 websites in 180 days. Lover of food, tequila and code.

One year ago today I sat down and started a project that has changed my life. That sounds totally corny but it’s true. April 1st of last year was day one of my 180 websites in 180 days project and I was super nervous. I had no idea how to code. My computer broke and I was using a borrowed laptop. And I set up this crazy learning challenge where if I failed everyone would see it. Clearly I was nuts. I remember thinking to myself if the project did fail I could call it an elaborate April Fool’s joke.

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via Collin (0) · This author doesn't currently have a bio.

The ideation process for entrepreneurial endeavors is often times the most glorified process of the start-up process. In movies it is seen as the 'ah-ha!' moment that magically comes said individual. But this is rarely the case, and if it is, the idea is usually lackluster at best.

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